Walker Bay Nature Reserve Conservation

Walker Bay is an important conservation area, home to lowland coastal fynbos, the endangered African black oystercatcher, the Cape clawless otter and many sought-after fish species.
The reserve’s predominant vegetation, known as strandveld, is characterised by bietou, blombos, sour fig and waxberry. In the past, parts of the dunefields were stabilised using alien rooikrans and Port Jackson. These invasive species, together with uncontrolled coastal development, pose a threat to the indigenous vegetation. Dense thickets of old milkwood trees line the banks of the Klein River lagoon.
Most of the mammals found in the reserve are rarely seen, although visitors may spot the tracks of the Cape clawless otter, bushbuck, duiker, grysbok and steenbok. The bay is a popular playground for southern right whales between June and November. Bryde’s and humpback whales, and various dolphin species, can be seen throughout the year. Marine fish include galjoen, kabeljou and steenbras, which may be caught at Galjoenbank, Sopiesklip, Skeurbank and other fishing sites.