Scientific Research

CapeNature is the regulatory authority in the Western Cape for the issuing of permits for fauna, flora, hunting and CITES.

In order to operate as efficiently as possible CapeNature needs to have a record of all scientific research/collection projects or inventory collections undertaken on its nature reserves, at least, but preferably those encompassing the Province as a whole (including private property).

Where to apply for Scientific Research permits: CapeNature Head Office

Please download and complete the application form below to conduct any scientific research on CapeNature reserves.

Download: CapeNature – Application Form – To Collect Fauna And Flora For Scientific And Research Purposes

Should any of the requested information (i.e. species to be collected, area concerned etc.) not be forthcoming, a clear reason/motivation for this omission must be provided.

If the space provided in the application form is not adequate, separate documents providing the requested information may be attached to the application form.

Hunting Permits

CapeNature is the regulatory authority in the Western Cape for the issuing of permits for fauna, flora, hunting and CITES.

Through the Permit Office, CapeNature strives to provide administrative support which is effective, fair and efficient, and monitor compliance in terms of all relevant environmental legislation.

CapeNature has recently published a guide for hunters in the Western Cape, so that all hunters are able to hunt legally in the province. To download this guide, click here or the image below.

Hunting-Guide-cover

Click the image above to download a PDF of the Guide for Hunters in the Western Cape

Hunting License

Where to apply: CapeNature regional offices in

  • George (044) 802 5300,
  • Porterville (022) 931 2900,
  • Oudtshoorn (044) 203 6300
  • Onrus (028) 316 3338,
  • Driftsands (021) 955 5940

Queries: Danelle Kleinhans

Call us on 087 087 4088 or email dkleinhans@capenature.co.za

Download the Application for a Hunting Licence by clicking here (a word document will open in a new tab).

Validity period

Determined upon application or as required.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 27 of the Ordinance a licence is required to hunt any protected wild animal during any hunting season. It is important to note that hunting licences are only valid for species that are reflected in the annual hunting notice. In this hunting notice, other import aspects such as: length of the hunting season, area(s) in which that season is applicable, daily bag limit and other hunting methods allowed, are reflected.

Prohibited Hunting Method Permit

Validity period

Determined upon application or as required.

Why must I have a permit?

Sections 29 and 33 of the Ordinance prescribe a number of hunting methods that are considered to be prohibited. These methods include: hunting with the aid of artificial light, hunting on or from a public road, hunting by means of any trap, hunting at night and by means of a bow-and-arrow, amongst various others. All of these hunting methods are considered to be prohibited in the Western Cape Province and a permit is required to use any of them to hunt any wild animal(s). It is important to note that researchers that wish to collect any wild animal(s) (which includes birds and insects) using a trap (which by definition includes the use of mist-nets, cages, box-traps, birdlimes etc.) must also apply for a prohibited hunting method before collecting any specimens.

There are concessions to scientific research collections (including birdringing permits).

Download: Application to hunt wild animals by means of a prohibited hunting method

The Hunting Notice

The Hunting Notice determines the hunting season, daily bag limits, prohibited hunting methods, as set out for the Western Cape Province for the year.

Download the Hunting Notice for 2019

Download the Hunting Notice for 2020

 

 

Flora Permits

CapeNature is the regulatory authority in the Western Cape for the issuing of permits for fauna, flora, hunting and CITES.

Through the Permit Office, CapeNature strives to provide administrative support which is effective, fair and efficient, and monitor compliance in terms of all relevant environmental legislation.

Where to apply for flora permits

CapeNature Head Office or any regional office.

Flora Permits

Endangered Flora Permit

Validity period

For transport usually one month; for possession three years.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 62 of the Ordinance no person shall without a permit be in possession of, sell, buy, donate, receive as a donation, pick or import into, export from or transport in or through the Western Cape any endangered flora.

Download: CapeNature Application Form for Endangered Flora

Flora Export & Import

Validity period

Permits are valid for one month from date of issue but may be issued for longer periods upon well motivated request.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 70 of the Ordinance no person may export any flora from the Western Cape Province or import any protected flora specified in CITES Appendix II into the Province without a permit.

Download: CapeNature Application Form – To Export And Import Protected Flora

Permit to Pick Flora

Validity period

Permits are usually valid for one year from date of issue but may be issued for longer periods upon well motivated request.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 63 of the Ordinance no person shall, without a permit, pick any endangered or protected flora from property that he or she is not the owner of, without a permit.

In addition, no person may pick any flora on a public road or on the land on either side of such road within a distance of ninety metres from the centre of such road, without a permit. In addition to a permit, to pick any flora from property that one is not the owner of, that property owner must grant his permission in writing to the permit holder allowing him to pick the species of flora mentioned on the permit.

Download: CapeNature Application Form To Pluck Protected Flora

Certificate of Registration as a Grower and Permit to Sell Endangered Flora

Validity period

Permits are valid for one year from date of issue.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 62 of the Ordinance no person shall, without a permit, sell any endangered flora that has been cultivated by that person without that person, firstly, being registered as a grower of such species of endangered flora and, secondly, that person receiving a permit to sell such endangered flora.

No permit is required to purchase, receive as a donation, transport or be in possession of any endangered flora that has been sold or donated by a registered grower/seller of endangered flora, as a receipt or similar such written document will suffice.

Kindly take note that a receipt or similar such written document does not permit the export of any endangered flora from the Western Cape Province and a separate permit must be applied for, to export any such endangered flora from the Province.

It is important to note that, with regard to Cycads, such annual permits to sell endangered flora are applicable only to plants classified as “seedlings”.

Cycad seedlings are any species of Cycad with a stem diameter less than 15 centimetres, other than the following species: Encephalartos caffer, E. cerinus, E. cupidus, E. humilis, E. ngoyanis and E. umbeluziensis, where any plant with a stem diameter less than 7 centimetres is regarded as a seedling.

Any plant with a stem diameter greater than 15 centimetres (or 7 centimetres for the fore-mentioned six species) is classified as an “adult plant” and to sell, buy, donate etc. any such plant that is legally in one’s possession requires the prior acquisition of an “Endangered Flora Permit” as mentioned below.

Validity period

Registered grower: licence valid for one year from date of payment.

Registered seller: licence valid for three years from date of payment.

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 65 of the Ordinance no person may sell protected flora without the prior registration of that person as a flora grower or seller and the acquisition of the appropriate licence to sell protected flora.

* The same application, registration and licence system applies to those that grow and sell artificially propagated/cultivate protected flora, except that licences for such operations are issued free of charge.

Download: CapeNature Application Form – For Registration As A Grower Or Seller Of Protected Flora

Fynbos Field Guides

The Flower Valley Conservation Trust has partnered with the Universities of Durham and Newcastle to put together The Field Guide for Wild Flower Harvesting, aimed at fynbos harvesters and landowners. The guide provides information on fynbos, the threats to fynbos and the need to harvest responsibly. Click on the links below to download the Field Guide in either English, Afrikaans or Xhosa (A pdf file will open in a new tab).

English: A6 version | Web Version

Afrikaans:  A6 version | Web Version

Xhosa:  A6 version | Web Version

 

Recreational Fishing Permit (dams and rivers)

Freshwater fishing is an extremely popular pastime in our province, with both alien and indigenous fish species being caught. Popular alien angling fishes include Carp, Largemouth Bass, Rainbow Trout and Mozambique Tilapia. Valued indigenous angling species include Clanwilliam Yellowfish and Berg-Breede Whitefish. These fishes can be identified in A Complete Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of Southern Africa by Paul Skelton.

It is a requirement of the Western Cape Nature Conservation Ordinance that freshwater anglers over the age of six-years-old are required to have an angling licence to fish public waters. Public waters comprise rivers and state dams (e.g. Theewaterskloof dam, Clanwilliam dam), but not privately owned farm dams where no licence is required.  

Download the Application for a Angling Licence by clicking here (a word document will open in a new tab)

Below you will find a list of good, accessible angling waters within 150 km of Cape Town, and their most commonly caught species.

  • Brandvlei Dam: carp and whitefish
  • Rietvlei: carp and Mozambique tilapia
  • Lakenvlei: rainbow trout
  • Misverstand Dam: carp, largemouth and smallmouth blackbass and Mozambique tilapia
  • Sandvlei: carp, Mozambique tilapia, sharptooth catfish and mullet
  • Theewaterskloof Dam: largemouth bass, carp, sharptooth catfish
  • Voelvlei: carp and sharptooth catfish
  • Zeekoevlei: carp, Mozambique tilapia and sharptooth catfish
  • Berg River: rainbow trout above Franschhoek. Above Paarl the river contains smallmouth bass and carp. The remainder of the river contains carp, Mozambique tilapia, sharptooth catfish and smallmouth bass.
  • Breede River: rainbow trout dominate its mountain tributaries (e.g. Elandsplaat, Holsloot and Molenaars rivers) but brown trout dominate the upper Witte River. The Breede River provides excellent angling for carp, smallmouth bass, catfish and some whitefish.
  • Eerste and Lourens rivers: rainbow trout are common in the sections above Stellenbosch and Somerset West respectively. Carp are common in the middle and lower river.
  • Liesbeek River: The lower reaches have large numbers of carp and sharptooth catfish.

To guide anglers, and encourage a culture of environmentally responsible recreational angling, a Code of Practice has been developed and is available to view or download on the image below.

Fishing

Code Of Practice For Freshwater Angling In The Western Cape

General Conservation Tips

  • Ensure that you have permission to fish on the waters you intend fishing, especially when on private land.
  • Contact numbers for trout and bass fishing are the Cape Piscatorial Society, Tel. (021) 424 7725 and Bassin’ Distributors Tel. (021) 930 6170.
  • Please do not litter and never throw away fishing line.
  • Litter is a hazard to human and fish health, and fish line can entangle and kill birds.
  • Please return indigenous fishes (e.g. Clanwilliam yellowfish, sawfin and whitefish) to the water. These fishes are threatened with extinction as they have been eliminated from much of their former ranges by alien fishes such as the two black bass species, carp and sharptooth catfish.
  • You need a permit to transport live fish from one waterbody to another.

Where to apply

CapeNature Head Office: 087 087 9262

Regional offices:

  • George: (044) 802 5300
  • Hermanus: (028) 316 3338
  • Driftsands: (021) 955 5940
  • Oudtshoorn: (044) 203 6300
  • Porterville: (022) 931 2900/7
  • Robertson: (023) 625 1621
  • Stellenbosch: (021) 866 1560

Head Office contact numbers for permits information: 087 087 9262 or email:
Nicole Stanley at reception@capenature.co.za or info@capenature.co.za

Validity period
12 months from date of issue

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 53 of the Ordinance no person may fish in any inland waters without an angling licence.

Download: Freshwater Fish Permit Application Form

Fauna Permits

CapeNature is the regulatory authority in the Western Cape for the issuing of permits for fauna, flora, hunting and CITES.

Through the Permit Office, CapeNature strives to provide administrative support which is effective, fair and efficient, and monitor compliance in terms of all relevant environmental legislation.

Where to apply for fauna permits

CapeNature Head Office or any regional office.

List of Fauna permits

Certificate of Adequate Enclosure

Validity period

Three years

Why must I have a permit?

A Certificate of Adequate Enclosure, issued in terms of section 35 of the Ordinance provides farm owners with various rights not usually afforded to other farm owners. These rights include, firstly, the hunting of the species of protected wild animal(s) specified on the Certificate at any time (i.e. out of official hunting season) and by any means (i.e. including the use of prohibited hunting methods, other than fire or poison) without the prior acquisition of a permit to do so, secondly, the capture and keeping in captivity of any animal(s) species that appears on the Certificate without having to first acquire a captivity permit and, thirdly, property owners with a Certificate of Adequate Enclosure may sell or donate any animal(s) or the carcase of any such animal(s), from the species that appears on their Certificate, without having to acquire a permit to do so. It is important to note that in the case of sale or donation of any live wild animal(s), in addition to a letter of sale or donation from the property owner, a transport permit is still required by the recipient of such wild animal(s) for the transport of any live wild animal(s) from a farm that has a Certificate of Adequate Enclosure. It is also important to note that a Certificate of Adequate Enclosure will lapse upon the transfer or lease of the land or any portion of such land in respect of which that Certificate was issued.

Download: Application Form – Certificate of Adequate Enclosure.

Export, Import and Transport of Wild Animals, Fish and Game

Validity period

One week to a month

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 44 (1)(a) of the Ordinance one needs a permit to import into, export from or transport in or through the Western Cape Province any wild animal. For birds this provision only applies to birds that are listed as protected or endangered in terms of the Ordinance. It is also important to draw a distinction between this Transport Permit and a CITES permit that is mentioned below.

Download: CapeNature – Fee Application Form – Transport Interprovincial No Capture

Download: CapeNature – Application Form – To import and Transport Wild Animals

Download: CapeNature – Application Form – To Capture and Export and/or Transport Fauna

Download: CapeNature – Application Form – To Import, Export, and Transport Live Fish

Permit to Possess the Carcase of an Endangered Wild Animal(s)

Validity period

Three years

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 26 of the Ordinance not only does one need a permit to possess any live endangered wild animal but one also needs a permit to possess the carcase or any part of the carcase of any such animal.

Download: CapeNature – Application – To Possess Endangered fauna – live or carcase.

Wild Animal Captivity Permit

Validity period

One to three years (depending on the amount of animals in captivity).

Why must I have a permit?

In terms of section 31 of the Ordinance no person may keep any wild animal(s) in captivity without a permit. For birds, a captivity permit is only required for bird species classified as protected or endangered in terms of the Ordinance.

Download: CapeNature – Application Form – Fauna in Captivity.

Wild animal educational/show/exhibition

Download: Application – Wild Animals in Shows and Exhibitions.

Sale of Game Permit

To meet our mandate, the sale of wild animals (including Game Species) is regulated by a permit system and permit requirements.

The following species, if up for private sale or auctions, are regarded by CapeNature as Ecotypical species.  Only indigenous to the Western Cape and subject to the requirements in annexure2 of GTUP

1. Blue Duiker
2. Bushbuck
3. Common duiker
4. Cape Grysbok
5. Grey Rhebuck
6. Klipspringer
7. Mountain Reedbuck
8. Steenbok

On application of the above ecotypical species, each application is subject to a full habitat evaluation and population assessment for both properties in order to make an informed recommendation.

The following species, if up for private sale or auctions, are subject to an approved Game Management Plan prior to the sale of the species.  These species are regarded as extralimital species to the Western Cape.  The list below are the frequently applied for species in the Western Cape and is not a full list which requires Management Plan – see annexure 2 of GTUP for the full table of species in general as well as their permitting requirements.

Please note to bring your Game Management Plan Approval letter with you on the day of the Auction to verify that your property has been approved to introduce the Game Species you have bought on auction.

1. Black Rhinoceros
2. Sable
3. Roan
4. White Rhinoceros (only habitat assessment)
5. Blue Wildebeest
6. Waterbuck
7. Giraffe (only a habitat assessment)

All Applications must meet the CapeNature Game Translocation and Utilization Policy (GTUP) as well as the CapeNature Fencing Policy.  Should Bontebok antelope be up for sale either private sales or auctions, must adhear to the requirements of the Bontebok Conservation Translocation and Utilization Policy. Further, a habitat evaluation (done by a CapeNature official in your region) must be conducted on both properties to inform an application recommendation.

For further information feel free to contact the CapeNature Permits Department during office hours (07:30 to 16:00) on 087 087 4088.  You may e-mail your requests or applications to permits.fax@capenature.co.za  or dkleinhans@capenature.co.za

CITES Permits

CITES is the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora. The processing of CITES applications is a costly exercise and since the CapeNature is no longer in a position to carry these overhead costs, this has necessitated the levying of an application fee for individual permit applications.

The fee per application is R400,00 (including VAT). Businesses/traders are required to register with CapeNature at a once-off payment of R8000,00 per annum (VAT included). Once registered, all permit applications received during the validity period of such registration will be processed free of charge, except for re-issue and the “express service” applications.

Download: CapeNature – CITES application form

An “Express Service” fee is payable for applications made to the CapeNature Head Office

A fee concession may be considered in respect of applications received from recognised research institutions or projects, and in respect of conservation programmes that are not conducted for commercial gain.

Payment is to be made by depositing the relevant amount into our bank account, and faxing or producing the deposit slip on application.

Banking details:
CapeNature
Nedbank
Account No.: 1452057117
Branch code: 145209

Fax your deposit slip and application to: 086 556 7734

CapeNature hopes to continue a happy relationship with our clients and is committed to better service delivery.

Contact numbers:
087 087 4088
or email dkleinhans@capenature.co.za

Where to apply: 
CapeNature Head Office

Validity period:
Export and re-export: six months from date of issue
Import: One year from date of issue

Why must you have a permit?
South Africa is a signatory to CITES and as such must comply with the import, export and re-export procedure as stipulated by CITES.
CapeNature is the CITES Management and Scientific Authority for exports out of and imports into the Western Cape Province from or to other countries.
Further details with regard to CITES can be found at: www.cites.org

Endorsements of CITES Permits

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) requires that South African CITES export and re-export permits be endorsed and shipments inspected. This mandatory  requirement is specified in Block 5 of the special conditions of your permit.

CITES export and re-export permits not endorsed will be considered invalid, resulting in detainment of shipments and possible seizure by the Customs authorities in countries of destination.

Please also note that effective from 1 May 2008, the United States Fish and Wildlife Services Office of Law Enforcement implemented a new U.S. regulation requiring that all CITES export permits be  endorsed prior to any CITES regulated goods being exported from South Africa to the United States  of America (USA).

It is imperative that you contact CapeNature to have your CITES export and re-export permit endorsed and shipment inspected prior to export from the Western Cape.

CITES Management Authority
CapeNature

Hiking Permits

CapeNature manages large areas in the Western Cape mountains and encourages hikers to enjoy the wild beauty of these areas.

For hiking permits please contact the CapeNature call centre on 087 087 8250.

Enquiries can also be emailed to reservation.alert@capenature.co.za

Hiker Safety

Being prepared is the key to having a safe and enjoyable experience on our trails. Become self-reliant by learning about the terrain, conditions, local weather and your equipment before you start. Even if you are headed out for just an hour, an injury, severe weather or a wrong turn could become life threatening. Never hike alone and pace your hike to the slowest person in your group.

Before heading out on a hike, make sure you have the relevant numbers programmed into your phone:
Mountain Rescue : 021 937-0300
West Coast Control : 022 433-8700
For all other areas, please ensure you have the local emergency services number in your phone before embarking.

CapeNature, Hiker Safety Guide

Download our Hiker Safety Guide

 

Download: There and back Safely – Hiking Protocol

The following guidelines will help ensure that your hike is safe and sound.

Planning
Plan your hike thoroughly. Pay attention to:

  • Permit requirements and gate times
  • Time of start and expected finish
  • Pace (3km/h is average)
  • Time of sunset and tides (Particularly at Robberg and De Hoop Nature Reserves)
  • Size of group (preferably three or more) – never hike alone.
  • Capability and responsibility of leader
  • Availability of water
  • Fitness and medical condition of group members – the slowest person determines the pace
  • Informing someone of your plans and expected time of return
  • Leaving a message with your name, size of group, route, expected time of return and a contact person clearly visible in your car.


Weather

Weather conditions can change very quickly in the mountains, even if the weather is good at lower altitudes. Trails will be closed in the event of dangerous weather. Do not attempt to hike if the trail is closed – it can endanger lives. If the weather becomes dangerous, make your way back to the start or to the nearest hut as quickly as possible. Do not attempt to complete the trail. Weather forecasts are available from 082 162. If in doubt, phone the reserve before leaving home.

Emergency Equipment

  • Always carry the following items:
  • Torch (with new batteries)
  • Pocket knife
  • First aid kit
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Waterproof gear
  • 1:50 000 contour map in Wilderness Areas
  • Compass
  • Space blanket
  • Whistle
  • No less than a 1,5l water bottle.

Clothing and Footwear
Take a wind- and waterproof anorak and woollen jersey (even in summer). Wear two pairs of socks. Change the inner pair every few hours to prevent blisters. Boots or shoes should be sturdy with strong non-slip soles and must be well worn-in. Tennis shoes and takkies are not suitable. Sun hats are essential, even on cool days. Use a sun block on all exposed parts – not only your face. In cold weather, wear a warm cap/beanie to prevent heat loss.

Food
Lightweight, nutritious energy foods include packet soups, dehydrated vegetables, powdered milk and soya-bean meats, dried fruit, raisins, cheese and chocolates. Carbohydrates like pasta, dehydrated potatoes and rice are convenient and energy-rich. Tinned and bottled foods add unwanted weight. Glass containers break easily. Drink fresh water. Alcohol is not advisable because it can impair judgement and cause dehydration.

Emergencies
In the event of an emergency or accident while hiking, keep the group together. Keep moving if possible. If you are unable to continue due to injury or collapse, or if weather conditions become too severe, seek shelter, dress warmly and stay in your sleeping bag. Stay on or close to the path, so that you are visible to a rescue party. Do not stray from a given route. in the event of an emergency, notify the relevant reserve office or phone 10111 if possible.

Being Lost

  • Never descend via unknown kloofs or slopes. Waterfalls, loose stones and hidden cliffs can be deadly.
  • Keep the group together.
  • Light and weather permitting, retrace your steps until reaching a known route. Otherwise, camp where you are until rescued.
  • Use bright items to reveal your position to search teams. Blow a whistle to attract attention.

Serious Accidents

  • Stay calm
  • Protect the person/s against further injury
  • Apply first-aid
  • Ensure that the rest of the group is safe
  • If possible, send two experienced group members to report the accident. Don’t abandon the injured person.
  • Give the authorities the following information: full names and age of the casualty; the type and severity of injury, the location of the accident (preferably on a 1:50 000 map with grid references), and the details of the rest of the group.

Hypothermia (exposure)
Wet, wind and cold can cause hypothermia. It can happen very quickly. Symptoms include exhaustion, stumbling, uncontrolled shivering, slurred speech, loss of memory and drowsiness. Hypothermia can be fatal. The following can help avoid hypothermia:

  • Stay dry: put on rain gear before you get wet
  • Strip off wet clothing and put on dry clothing
  • Beware of wind – it whips heat away from skin and cools wet clothes
  • Wear a warm cap to avoid heat loss
  • Have warm, sweet drinks
  • Seek shelter while you still have energy, but try to stay near the path.

Hyperthermia (heat exhaustion)
Hot weather, insufficient liquid and exhaustion can cause hyperthermia or heat exhaustion. Symptoms can include exhaustion, stumbling, dizziness, headaches and impaired vision. The following can help to avoid hyperthermia:

  • Hike in the cool of morning and evening
  • Rest in the shade during midday
  • Wear a sun hat with a wide brim to protect the back of your neck
  • Drink at least 250 ml (one cup) of water every hour
  • Wear cool, cotton-type clothing.

Mountain Fires
Mountain fires can be deadly. Follow these guidelines to avoid danger:

  • Stay calm and think in practical terms. Keep your group together, keep water bottles filled and, if possible, wet your equipment and clothes. Synthetic materials can melt.
  • Never try to out-run a fire, especially uphill. Take note of changes in wind direction.
  • Find water, rock slabs or cleared areas and stay there. Avoid thick bush, kloofs and rocky areas where you could be trapped.
  • Try to keep to jeep tracks, paths or open slopes. If you are in a hut or building, stay there.
  • Never try to start a back-burn; you can cause even more danger.
  • Remove gas canisters and all other fuel and inflammable objects from your rucksack. Store them in a safe place.
  • Keep a lookout for helicopters. Wave bright items to attract attention.
  • Inform the trail authorities when you reach the end of your hike.

Flooded Rivers
Try to avoid crossing a flooded mountain stream. Rather wait until the water level has dropped, then cross at a safe place.

Lightning
If a thunderstorm is brewing, immediately move away from high ground (summits, exposed necks /cols and ridges), prominent trees, power lines and similar lightning conductors. Seek shelter in low bush or inside a dry cave or overhang.

Finally, remember that rescue operations are costly, difficult and can also endanger the rescuers. Relatively few rescue teams serve large mountainous areas, diminishing your chance of a speedy rescue. Make safety your priority.