Visit South Africa's official Covid-19 resource portal
1 Sep 2021 by Edith Henn
African Medicinal Plant Day _ 31st August 2021

Human relationships with plants date back for centuries. Plants support life on earth provides habitat for animals and can be a source of medicine, with many healing capabilities. Many of the African continent’s population rely on traditional medicine for their basic health needs. CapeNature is proud of the relationships it has fostered with local communities surrounding the reserves who source their own medicine via plants

31 Aug 2021
Interview a tree and win big!

Kids – got something to say?

In celebration of Arbour Day 2021, CapeNature is giving away an outdoor solar pack to lucky winners with its Interview with a Tree competition. Kids play the part of the interviewee and get your friends, sibling, parent, or teacher to play the part of the tree.

31 Aug 2021
CapeNature joins the "Plant a million trees" movement

CapeNature has joined a global-urban and community greening movement called ‘Plant One Million Trees’. Typically, these are linked to days on the environmental calendar such as Arbour Day, Plant Appreciation Day, Biodiversity Day, Earth Day and World Environment Day. This initiative seeks to boost these successes and bring them under one banner known as the Plant a Million Trees Campaign.

25 Aug 2021
The Critically Endangered Caledon Conebush

The critically endangered Caledon conebush, Leucadendron salteri subsp. elimense, occurs in an area of less than 9 km², in four small, severely fragmented subpopulations. It continues to decline due to alien plant invasion, ongoing habitat loss to agriculture, and wildflower harvesting.

6 Jul 2021 by CapeNature and COGHSPCSA
The humane use of paintball markers for baboon management

CapeNature hereby confirms that the humane use of paintball markers as an aversion tool to keep baboons out of the urban areas and in their natural habitat, remains legal.

6 Jul 2021
Save our biodiversity by helping us fight plant poaching!

We are currently facing challenges in the Western Cape with succulent plant poaching. The succulent plant trade has thus changed into an operation much like that of rhino poaching, where the main role-players sit offshore, and the poaching is done by local people.